45 Angle We're the real Millers Photo

Welcome to the Lincoln City 45 angle

We're the Real Millers. 

We like to have fun pictures on are traveling. This is our yearly family gathering. We pick a place and spend good quality family times. 

We all stayed at the http://www.sandcastlemotel.net/

3417 SW Anchor Ave.
Lincoln City, OR. 97367

800-225-0693 

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Kathryn Albertson Park

Kathryn Albertson Park is a 41-acre special use park located near downtown Boise. A haven for wildlife and quiet contemplation, the park features wide, paved footpaths and reservable outdoor gazebos in a beautiful natural setting. More info http://parks.cityofboise.org/parks-locations/parks/kathryn-albertson-park/

Click on the image 360 view

Click on the image 360 view

History & Features

A bit of history can be found while walking around the park.

The Rookery, a gazebo named after a place where birds breed or congregate, sports the red tile roof that formerly topped Albertson's first supermarket, which opened in Boise in 1939. Supporting the roof are broad beams from an airport hangar previously located where Boise State University now stands, and once visited by Charles Lindbergh.

Designed as an outdoor classroom, The Rookery's displays depict wetland habitat, endangered species, bird adaptations, and riparian management. Although most of the rock used in this park is Boise sandstone, inlaid in the floor of The Rookery are small, reddish granite stones imported from Germany. Adjacent to The Rookery is a cross-section of the world's largest ponderosa pine tree, estimated to be 376 years old.

The second gazebo, The Eyrie, was named after the nest of a bird prey. The impressive stone and beam construction of The Rookery is repeated here. You will find a rustic, lean-to roof of huge rounded beams and specially milled split cedar poles. The roof and walls frame a secluded alcove with stone benches that face an arrangement of massive sandstone fountains.

The bird-related names of the gazebos are fitting, as bird watchers will discover. The presence and songs of the birds are an ongoing delight, and highlight any visit to the park. California Quail, Buffleheads, Great Blue Herons, Mallards and Yellowheaded Blackbirds are some of the more commonly sighted and heard birds.

 
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Camels back park

CAMEL'S BACK PARK

The Camel's Back Park site was acquired by the City of Boise in 1932 from Bernard Lemp, a relative of a former mayor.  The developed portion of the park is approximately 11 acres.  The park was developed primarily through individual and organization donations, including National Guard, local Rotary Club, Optimist Club, and the Boise Jaycees.  The park was dedicated in 1965.  Park amenities include a playground, tennis courts, picnic area, and access to the foothills.  

360 view click here. 

360 view click here. 

 
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1000 Springs

1000 Springs Resort in Hagerman, ID!

Enjoying swimming in our large indoor swimming pool or relaxing in the hot springs jacuzzis at our resort. Hagerman, ID, is a fabulous location for that getaway you deserve. Check out our wonderful amenities, including the camp ground and RV park. Call today!

360 View

360 View

180 view

180 view

 
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Craters Of The Moon National Monument

Craters Of The Moon National Monument

http://www.nps.gov/crmo/index.htm

Craters of the Moon formed during eight major eruptive periods between 15,000 and 2000 years ago. Lava erupted from the Great Rift, a series of deep cracks that start near the visitor center and stretch 52 miles (84 km.) to the southeast. During this time the Craters of the Moon lava field grew to cover 618 square miles (1600 square km.).The smaller Wapi and Kings Bowl lava fields also formed along the Great Rift during the most recent eruptive period (approximately 2000 years ago).

Click on the image to see 360 view

Click on the image to see 360 view

Click on the image to see 360 view

Click on the image to see 360 view

Click on the image to see 360 view

Click on the image to see 360 view

 

Penny wall

Penny wall Mountain Home Idaho

Click on this image to watch the video

Click on this image to watch the video

Penny wall. Thousands of pennies on a 9 x 32 ft wall. Wishing wall under the penny wall. 

MOUNTAIN HOME, Idaho -- Randy Miller of Mountain Home is hard at work "changing" the look of his hometown.

Penny for your thoughts?

Make that thousands of pennies. Miller says he's actually used 14gallons of them to build a 9' x 33' mural featuring symbols from his town. He's used caulk, simple tools, and volunteers to help. The stylized and shiny installation is currently taking up space by Kurly's Bar on Jackson and Main streets.

Miller sent KTVB a Facebook message with a simple explanation of why he's creating this unique piece of art.

"Im doing this all for free," Miller said. "Im not done yet, but I just want to show off a little. I've worked hard on this mural."

What do you think?

Penny wall finished

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

http://www.mountainhomenews.com  

by Brian S. Orban -  did a wonderful job in the newspaper. Thank you.

Randy Miller has completed his penny wall, located on the alley wall of Kurly's bar on E. Jackson Street.

It took a little over two years and more than 430 pounds of spare change to make it happen, but Randy Miller's vision finally became a reality.

On a sunny Saturday afternoon, he put the finishing touches on what he hopes will be a new tourist destination in the city's downtown area that literally took shape one penny at a time.

A local artist, Miller transformed a plain, cinder block wall of Kurly's sports bar and grill into a mural composed of spare pocket change. Known as the Penny Wall, it covers the upper half of the roughly 46-by-16 foot alleyway wall.

"I'm glad it's done because there's a lot of meaning behind it," Miller said. In addition to having people come out and view this new display, he hopes it'll also encourage folks to stop by the different shops and businesses in this part of town.

"If this helps Mountain Home, then I'm all for that," he said.

The Penny Wall project started in August 2010 when Miller started collecting the gallons of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters needed to create the Mountain Home-specific artwork. The all-volunteer project remained on hold for a few months as he also stored up enough of the specialized glue needed to keep the coins permanently attached to the mural.

Miller credited the local Dig-It group for donating those supplies.

Last September, he got to work gluing the first of the 15 gallons of coins to an outer frame composed of weather-resistant material. Pennies make up a majority of the frame's composition. Meanwhile, other types of coins were used to spell out "Mountain Home" and to create a silhouette of a fighter jet in the mural's upper left-hand corner.

During the first step of the project, Miller also cut sections of this foam material into different lengths and depths. Once the coins were added, it helped create a sense of depth.

While he got a start on the Penny Wall last fall, Miller had to put everything on hold due to adverse weather while also trying to work time into his schedule to continue the project. In addition, he ran out of his supply of the special adhesive.

"One tube alone costs $4, and I went through a lot more than I originally thought I'd need," Miller said.

It took more than 45 hours spread over five consecutive days this month for Miller to finish the creation. He glued the last pennies to the wall Sept. 15.

"All I wanted to do was go to bed. I was done; I was physically beat," said Miller as he reflected on completing the mural. "The last 'mile' was the hardest because it really started to wear on me."

For Miller, completing this mural was a matter of pride and a way for him to leave his own mark in the Mountain Home community.

"It was my own personal test in terms of just doing something like this," he said. "It's a big project and something I'd never seen done before."

Although the mural is complete, there's still plenty of space for others to become part of Penny Wall. A section of wall below the mural serves as a "wishing wall" where people can take their own spare change and turn it into pictures or personal messages.

Tubes of the special adhesive needed to affix coins to the wall will be available from businesses next to the mural.

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